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Anna Powell’s ‘Deleuze, Altered States and Film’ now in paperback

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Deleuze, Altered States and Film

January 26th, 2012 - 12:25pm

Issue 2 of Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the publication of Issue 2 of Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image, which is now available for free download at http://cjpmi.ifl.pt/2-contents. Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image is an international peer-reviewed publication devoted to the philosophical inquiry into cinema. It gathers scholars and contributions from different philosophical traditions and it is published online by the Philosophy of Language Institute, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, New University of Lisbon.

Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image Issue 2 (December 2011)

Contents:

Articles

THE PHILOSOPHY OF FILM AND FILM AS PHILOSOPHY, Tom McClelland

LAYERING IMAGES, THWARTING FABLES: DELEUZE, RANCIÈRE AND THE ALLEGORIES OF CINEMA, Agustin Zarzosa

THE TWILIGHT OF THE INDEX, Temenuga Trifonova

SEMIOTIC IMAGES, Flore Chevaillier

“BIOPOLITICS ON SCREEN”: AERNOUT MIK’S MOVING-IMAGE INSTALLATIONS, Gabriella Calchi-Novati

PARA UMA TEORIA DO CLICHÉ, Leonor Areal

TÉCNICAS CINEMATOGRÁFICAS E ACTOS MENTAIS:THE PHOTOPLAY DE HUGO MÜNSTERBERG, Teresa Pedro

Translation

MERLEAU-PONTY E O PENSAMENTO DO CINEMA , Mauro Carbone, trad. Débora Quaresma e Davide Scarso

Interview

QUESTIONS FOR JACQUES RANCIÈRE AROUND HIS BOOK LES ÉCARTS DU CINÉMA [ENG.]/ QUESTIONS À JACQUES RANCIÈRE AUTOUR DE SON LIVRE LES ÉCARTS DU CINÉMA [FR.], Conducted by Susana Nascimento Duarte

Conference Report

FILM-PHILOSOPHY CONFERENCE (LIVERPOOL JOHN MOORES UNIVERSITY, 6-8 JULY 2011), William Brown

Book Reviews

CEM MIL CIGARROS: OS FILMES DE PEDRO COSTA, Iván Villarmea Álvarez

MAGNÍFICAS OBSESSÕES: JOÃO BÉNARD DA COSTA, UM PROGRAMADOR DE CINEMA, Paulo Cunha

–  Susana Viegas

Instituto de Filosofia da Linguagem

Universidade Nova de Lisboa

 

 

 

January 16th, 2012 - 14:18pm

How to use Deleuze in thinking about Screen Media

Dr Felicity Colman will be discussing her new book at Salford University, Wednesday 2nd November
4.15pm – 5.30pm: Second floor lecture theatre, Adelphi House
5.30pm : King’s Arms for refreshments
(Host: Ben Halligan)

Building 3 on page 3 of this map: http://www.salford.ac.uk/travel/campus-map.pdf <http://www.salford.ac.uk/travel/campus-map.pdf>

(NB: Not Adelphi Building, and beware of Google Maps that confuses the two).

If you need parking, please let Ben Halligan know ahead of time: b.ha...@salford.ac.uk <mailto:b.ha...@salford.ac.uk>

Dr Felicity Colman is a Reader in Screen Media in the Dept of Media at MMU. She is the author of Deleuze and Cinema (Berg 2011) and editor of Film, Theory and Philosophy (2009) and co-editor of Sensorium: Aesthetics, Art, Life (2007). She is working on a number of book projects that engage screen media forms, including Bergson and Film, and Screen Media Semiologies.

Gilles Deleuze published two radical books on film: “Cinema 1: The Movement-Image” and “Cinema 2: The Time-Image”. Engaging with a wide range of film styles, histories and theories, Deleuze’s writings treat film as a new form of philosophy. This cine-philosophy offers a startling new way of understanding the complexities of the moving image, its technical concerns and constraints as well as its psychological and political outcomes. In this talk I’ll look at some of the key concepts behind Deleuze’s revolutionary theory of the cinema (affect, time, thought, politics, etc), and discuss how Deleuze’s radical methodology is useful for all forms of for screen media analysis.

October 26th, 2011 - 11:23am

New publication

Semblance and Event: Activist Philosophy and the Occurrent Arts

Semblance and Event: Activist Philosophy and the Occurrent Arts

(MIT Press)

Brian Massumi

Endorsements

“Semblance and Event is a book about the smallest things, and the biggest. Brian Massumi effectively overcomes what Gilles Deleuze once described as the ‘wrenching duality’ of aesthetics. Massumi brings together action and contemplation; he finds the extraordinary in the everyday, and vice versa. This is a book about the life in art, and the art in life: a political aesthetics for the twenty-first century.”

—Steven Shaviro, DeRoy Professor of English, Wayne State University; author of Without Criteria: Kant, Whitehead, Deleuze, and Aesthetics

 

“Brian Massumi practices an ‘activist’ philosophy indeed, as his writing craft produces an intensive indiscernibility between the abstraction of philosophical concepts and the activation of aesthetic experience associated with art. This amazing book induces a participative thinking-feeling that does not criticize but rather sweeps away the deadening disjunctions paralyzing the adventure of experience.”

—Isabelle Stengers, philosopher of science, Free University of Brussels; author of Thinking with Whitehead: A Free and Wild Creation of Concepts

 

Events are always passing; to experience an event is to experience the passing. But how do we perceive an experience that encompasses the just-was and the is-about-to-be as much as what is actually present? In Semblance and Event, Brian Massumi, drawing on the work of William James, Alfred North Whitehead, Gilles Deleuze, and others, develops the concept of “semblance” as a way to approach this question.

 

It is, he argues, a question of abstraction, not as the opposite of the concrete but as a dimension of it: “lived abstraction.” A semblance is a lived abstraction. Massumi uses the category of the semblance toinvestigate practices of art that are relational and event-oriented–variously known as interactive art, ephemeral art, performance art, art intervention–which he refers to collectively as the “occurrent arts.” Massumi argues that traditional art practices, including perspective painting, conventionally considered to be object-oriented freeze frames, also organize events of perception, and must be considered occurrent arts in their own way. Each art practice invents its own kinds of relational events of lived abstraction, to produce a signature species of semblance.

 

The artwork’s relational engagement, Massumi continues, gives it a political valence just as necessary and immediate as the aesthetic dimension. Massumi investigates occurrent art practices in order to examine, on the broadest level, how the aesthetic and the political are always intertwined in any creative activity.

 

About the Author

 

Brian Massumi is Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences at the University of Montréal. He is the author of Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation and A User’s Guide to Capitalism and Schizophrenia: Deviations from Deleuze and Guattari (MIT Press, 1992).

October 18th, 2011 - 09:32am

Powers of the False Symposium

CALL FOR PAPERS AND FILM/VIDEO SUBMISSIONS

Institut Francais & Cine Lumiere, London, UK May 25th-26th 2012 (dates to be confirmed)

“There is a power inherent in the false: the positive power of ruse, the power to gain a strategic advantage by masking one’s life force.”

(Brian Massumi, REALER THAN REAL, The Simulacrum According to Deleuze and Guattari)

 

This two-day symposium addresses the complex ethics of the manipulation of real people and events in documentary, fact-fiction hybrid cinema and artists’ moving image.  Through close readings and screenings of contemporary and historical films that deliberately falsify actuality, the Powers of the False symposium will ask, can there be an ethic of falsification in the encounter between filmmaker and subject? How can we document something whose truth has many sides or may be inscrutable? Is the act of documenting always inevitably performative?  The symposium will also examine instances where the subjects of films have deliberately deceived filmmakers. Inspired by Gilles Deleuze’s theories of minor cinema and his term ‘powers of the false’, the symposium will turn to other philosophers too, to approach its central conceptual and ethical questions, including Levinas’ philosophy of alterity.

 

Academic research methods regard most filmmaking practices as unethical, particularly documentary filmmaking because of its direct encounter with actuality. The principles of consent for sociological research are anathema to factual film production, because total editorial control can never be given to the subjects. Instead, prior-consent is necessary. Moving image artists tend to disregard contributor consent forms and often freely intervene in the lives of their subjects. The activity of filmmaking is clearly predisposed to manipulation, and film productions inexorably produce alteration and change. Powers of the False looks at filmmaking as a site for performing difference and as a manipulative and coercive agency. When and for what reason is forgery, manipulation and deception conceptually motivated, even ethically necessary? How are we as human subjects changed by filming and by being filmed?

 

Topics may include:

* Inventing the past and fictionalising the present in the factual film; ethno-fiction.

* Staged events and re-enactments.

* Instances where filmmakers have deliberately delayed, intervened in, or given testimony in legal proceedings, or have broken the law.

* Films that have to come to light as true/false over time; film hoaxes.

* Films where authorship has been shared with, or passed over to, a subject.

* Films where the subject has manipulated the filmmaker.

* Films that have significantly altered personal or historical events, whether positively or negatively.

* Directionless films guided by an encounter with a subject.

* The docudrama, the drama-documentary, the mock-documentary and the cinematic essay.

* Iterations of subjectivity within the factual frame, recollection images, use of free indirect discourse.

 

Suggested artists and filmmakers for consideration as topics of discussion include Jean Rouch, Chantal Ackerman, Werner Herzog, Agnes Varda, Sophie Calle, Chris Marker, Abbas Kiarostami, Errol Morris, Nick Broomfield, Ulrich Seidl, Andrew Kötting, Ben Hopkins, Clio Barnard. This list is by no means exhaustive.

 

The papers and short film/video works presented over the weekend will be edited into a published collection of essays (accompanied by a DVD).

 

Please email abstracts for papers or films no more than 20 minutes in length by Dec 1st 2011, attn of:

 

Steven Eastwood  (University of East London): eastwood@uel.ac.uk<mailto:eastwood@uel.ac.uk>

Catherine Wheatley (Kings College London): catherine.wheatley@kcl.ac.uk<http://kcl.ac.uk>

 

 

Powers of the False symposium supported by The University of East London and Kings College London

 

September 29th, 2011 - 12:02pm

Lines of Flight: Everyday Resistance along England’s backbone

A film by Sal Brown and Martin Wood

Tuesday 11th October 2011 7.15pm
Manchester Lecture Theatre, All Saints Building, Oxford Rd.
FREE – ALL WELCOME

Insightful with a little frisson of fear, Lines of Flight invokes the connection between industrial towns and the barren wilderness of the northern English Pennines. Incorporating Deleuzian concepts of smooth and striated space and deterritorialisation, the film counterpoises our world of mass-culture with the captivating experience of free solo rock climbing.

The screening will be preceded by a presentation from one of the directors of the film, Martin Wood, who will be discussing the film with particular reference to its Deleuzian influences.

After the film, Martin will be taking part in a short interview with a fellow climbing enthusiast, and then taking questions from the audience. The aim of the event is to bring together Deleuze, film and outdoor enthusiasts to explore the conjunctions and ideas brought together in the film. The event will also be filmed for future inclusion in the MMU Deleuze Studies journal, Actual/Virtual.

The full programme of activities is as follows:
7.15pm – Presentation by Martin Wood
7.35pm – Film screening
8.00pm – Interview
8.20pm – Questions from the audience
8.40pm – Move to Sandbar for further informal discussion

This event is an exciting opportunity to experience the thrill of free climbing and the intellectual stimulation of philosophy combined. Featuring footage of stunning regional scenery and climbing classics such as The File, Flying Buttress Direct, Demon Rib, Western Front and Wellington Crack, the event is open to all and should appeal to anyone interested in the north of England, the city versus the country and what freedom means in the modern world.

“really beautiful…gets into what climbing is all about” – Graham Hoey
“A film for any thoughtful person, whether you climb or not” – Reel Earth
International Film Festival Award Winner

Organised in conjunction with:
Trauma Film Screenings:

http://www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/trauma/

www.twitter.com/TraumaFilm
www.facebook.com/TraumaFilm

September 2nd, 2011 - 12:52pm

Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the launch of Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image. Its inaugural issue is now available for free download at www.fcsh.unl.pt/revistas/cjpmi.

Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image is a new international peer-reviewed publication devoted to the philosophical inquiry into cinema. It gathers scholars and contributions from different philosophical traditions and it is published online by the Philosophy of Language Institute, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, New University of Lisbon.

Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image
Issue 1 (December 2010)

Contents:

Editorial
Patrícia Silveirinha Castello Branco, Sérgio Dias Branco, Susana Viegas (New University of Lisbon)

ARTICLES
A Care for the Claims of Theory
D. N. Rodowick (Harvard University)
Carroll on the Moving Image
Thomas E. Wartenberg (Mount Holyoke College)
Deleuze: The Thinking of the Brain
Raymond Bellour (CNRS/Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3)
Mucous, Monsters and Angels: Irigaray and Zulawski’s Possession
Patricia MacCormack (Anglia Ruskin University)
Film Theory Meets Analytic Philosophy; or, Film Studies and l’affaire Sokal
Murray Smith (University of Kent)

INTERVIEWS
Georges Didi-Huberman: « …. Ce qui rend le temps lisible, c’est l´image»
Susana Nascimento Duarte, Maria Irene Aparício (New University of Lisbon)

CONFERENCE REPORTS
Cognitive Deleuze: Report on the SCSMI Conference (Roanoke, 2-5 June 2010) and the Deleuze Studies Conference (Amsterdam, 12-14 July 2010)
William Brown (Roehampton University)

Editorial team here.
CFP for Issue 2 here.

CINEMA: JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY AND THE MOVING IMAGE
Patrícia Silveirinha Castello Branco, editor
Sérgio Dias Branco, associate editor
Susana Viegas, associate editor

www.fcsh.unl.pt/revistas/cjpmi

December 21st, 2010 - 12:09pm

Film-Philosophy Conference 2011 – CFP

Liverpool John Moores University

July 6, 2011 – July 8, 2011

Film-philosophy continues to grow as an important discipline within the fields of both Film Studies and Philosophy. We invite researchers in this area to submit proposals for the 2011 Film-Philosophy Conference to be held in Liverpool, UK.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Professor Gregory Currie (University of Nottingham)
Dr. David Martin-Jones (University of St Andrews)

Download Conference Poster

We are open to any topics on the subject but would particularly welcome papers in the following areas:

- Film and phenomenology

- The ontology of fiction in film

- Fictionalism and film

- Significant auteurs

- New approaches to film and philosophy

- Considerations of individual films

- The debate between continental and analytic philosophy in relation to film

- Films about philosophy or philosophers

- Animals on film

- Science and film-philosophy

- The methodology of film-philosophy

- Philosophy of film adaptation

- Film-philosophy and computer games

- Cognitivism

- Film style

- Genre

- Media convergence

- Philosophy and film economics

Abstracts should be 200 – 300 words long and papers, including clips – which we strongly encourage – should not exceed 25 minutes. We accept panel submissions with a maximum of three speakers and a length of 90 minutes.

Deadline for proposals: 18 March 2011

Registration now open: 90 GBP / 55 GBP (students/unwaged). Day rates available. Please note that registration does not guarantee acceptance of proposal

(there is no cost attached to submitting a proposal, but the registration fee is payable if your paper is accepted).

You must register an account with the conference website in order to submit a proposal.

Both individual and panel proposals must be submitted through the conference website (no initial cost involved)

December 6th, 2010 - 12:54pm

CFP – Deleuze and Photography

Rhizomes Special Issue: Deleuze and Photography

Please send inquiries, questions, and submissions to Michael Kramp

In his treatment of the modernist painter Francis Bacon, Deleuze argues that we are “besieged by photographs.” These mechanically-(re)produced images, according to Deleuze, can function as narratives, clichés, and memories that limit or regulate our creative efforts. The documentary technology, in other words, can be deployed to suspend and stagnate creative energies by representing that which is already known, fixed, or certain. Deleuze urges us to disrupt the reifying work of such representations and clichés, and reminds us that “to create is to lighten, to unburden life, to invent new possibilities of life.” While the last twenty years has witnessed an explosion of Deleuzian readings of painting, film, and their aesthetic powers, photography has (perhaps understandably) received notably little attention from Deleuze scholars. And yet, despite the apparent technological limitations of still frames, photographers have shown the potential to generate Deleuzian images, suggest lines of flight, and imagine new kinds of becomings. This special issue of Rhizomes seeks contributions that address photography’s ability to address, treat, or disrupt the imposed objectivity and pre-disposed documentation of the mechanically-reproduced image, engender new forms of creativity, and point toward productive desires. Possible topics may include the digitization of photography, the representation of movement, dynamism, or temporality, the depiction of becoming-woman/becoming-animal, the limits of the photographic frame, analyses of camera technology, or Deleuzian tendencies in the history of photography. Critical and creative writings are welcome, as are photographic exhibits and reviews. While Rhizomes always welcome Deleuzian approaches, we are happy to consider other approaches, as well. Completed essays, reviews, and exhibits are due 8/1/11.

December 6th, 2010 - 12:14pm

Facs of Life Deleuze Film Event at Tate

Tate Britain - Turner Prize Exhibition

Wednesday 8 December 2010, 14.00–17.50

Screening of Facs of Lifebetween Gilles Deleuze and his students (HDV, F/I/UK 2009) by Silvia Maglioni and Graeme Thomson

Roundtable discussion: The Otolith Group, Silvia Maglioni, Graeme Thomson.

November 29th, 2010 - 07:50am